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This animation comments a demo of SensibleData on an open dataset (Wikidata).

Feel free to compare with your favorite search engine or digital assistant...

Start the animation

Based on LEXISTEMS' Sensible.ai technologies, SensibleData queries data by meaning. Here is an example of a tricky question and a perfect answer returned (BTW: that's an excellent test for search engines and other personal assistants...). Each answer element has a clickable title which links to the relevant data in the target knowledge base (Wikidata here).

Sliding the answer of the previous screenshot... Note the "Idea" zone in the demo app that offers 1-click question buttons (for digging deeper on the current topic, on other topics or just for fun). The questions relate to Donald Trump, not his children. That's because...

...SensibleData's 1-click questions are in fact relevant to context. In this screenshot, we clicked on "place of birth", and got the corresponding answer. In addition to being very handy, this shows SensibleData's smart use of context to return results.

Sliding the answer of the previous screenshot...

This screenshot shows a simple question with an answer containing a full text and an image, both extracted by meaning from the target knowledge base. Note the "street" phrasing.

Scrolling down the previous screenshot, we see more contextual 1-click questions. These are related to the topic of the question (Bob Marley) rather than to the topic of the answer (Reggae). This adaptive process inherent to SensibleData can be configured easily. Let's click on "place of birth"...

Clicking on "place of birth" in the previous screenshot returned a compound answer (text + image). The context-related buttons return the same results as if the question had been asked "completely". If data is available in the target knowledge base, it will be aggregated according to API or user settings.

Another example of SensibleData' technological advance. The question might look silly but it is interesting from a data science standpoint as it is conceptual, poorly phrased and has misleading keywords. NB: SensibleData also offers links to more websites related to the topic (the star is for Donald Trump's official website).

Another example of answer returned from a SensibleData 1-click contextual question, with the aggregated elements and more context buttons.

SensibleData accepts colloquial entity names, even foreign.

Of course, SensibleData can return simple, factual answers to simple, factual questions. Three examples of data types here: one encyclopedic, one mathematic (intentionally simple), one geographic.

Using the 1-click context questions is an efficient way to dig deeper into something. Ok, regardless of the phrasing, most people know that William Shakespeare wrote Hamlet but...

Clicking on "characters" gives you the Dramatis Personae of the play in 1 click...

...as well as the narrative location...

...as well as more information about the Tragedy genre - and the list goes on. Is there any quicker and more transverse way to browse a topic?

Another example of a composite, listed answer on a simple question that most assistants and search engines won't answer directly.

Sliding the answer of the previous screenshot...

The API is permissive regarding questions phrasing. Note also that there are several famous people named "Bach". Here, SensibleData is configured to return only the most consulted result, but many other conditions or statistical scorings are applicable (recency, update, length, additional elements...).

Since SensibleData always include its "sources" in the results it returns, adding a verification or a sources consulting process right into SensibleData powered applications is just one parameter away.